Sensory Table

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Name:
Shannon Shannon
Email:
shannon_squared@hotmail.com

2-12-01

For the children who are to small to play safe at the water table, you can fill the tray on the high chair with water, food coloring, and items that will sink and float. The little ones love this and must admit I do too.

Name:
Diane
Email:
dbcd114@aol.com

2-12-01

We use a sensory tub in the two year old classroom. Each week the teacher puts something new and exciting in the tub and sits it on a plastic tablecloth on the floor. Then the children can sit around the tub and see what is inside. One time we bought live goldfish and put them in the tub. The children used small fish tank nets to try and catch the wiggly fish. They had a wonderful time. The fish were then added to the fish tank in the classroom which has a lid and is eye level so that the children can observe the fish without direct supervision. We did supervise this activity closely and the children still want to know when they get to catch the "fishes" again.

Name:
Amy in MA
Email:
argilman@yahoo.com

2-12-01

If you use sand a lot in your sensory table, here's a few ways to add variation. You can let the children add plastic glitter (safer than metal) to create shiny sand. You can have them add some colored sand to create patches of color, and then mix the colors into the sand and see what happens. You can encourage them add water, and see what happens. Ice cubes are fun to watch melt into the sand.

Name:
Amy in MA
Email:
argilman@yahoo.com

2-12-01

Once the children are all comfortable using eyedroppers successfully, try this! Make large clear Jell-O blocks. Put in the sensory table with small pans of colored water and long droppers or pipettes (Discount School Supply carries them). Encourage the children to poke the droppers into the colored water, squeeze up some colored water, and then poke the droppers into the Jell-O. Squeeze the dropper to release the colored water, and they've made beautiful colored tunnels in the Jell-O! This can get messy, so have the children wear smocks.

Name:
Amy in MA
Email:
argilman@yahoo.com

2-12-01

When using water in the sensory table (and I start out with just 2 inches until the children all get the idea of keeping their hands over the table! LOL), my group's favorite tool is turkey basters or pipettes (long eyedroppers). You need to help them discover how to squeeze the bulb to pick up the water, and then squeeze again to release it. They will be just so pleased! Let them add colored water this way so they can see more clearly what's happening.

Name:
Stacie Linkletter
Email:
slinkletter@pinehurst.net

2-12-01

This is a great sensory activity for most ages. I take used coffee grounds that I let dry out, and mix with regular flour. This "coffee sand" has two distinct textures and a great smell. The children love to help mix it up.

Name:
Stacie Linkletter
Email:
slinkletter@pinehurst.net

2-12-01

"Them Bones" I buy a cheap bag or box of dog biscuits that have a variety of sizes and add the bones to my sand table. I cover the bones well so the children do not see them right away. The children dig for their bones and then assemble a dinosaur by gluing the bones on construction paper.

Contact_FullName:
kristin
Contact_Email:
kristin_krumm@hotmail.com

2-9-01

I took a large Rubbermaid container and filled it with cheerios to make a sensory table for my young toddlers. Any cereal can be used-this way it's ok if any goes in the mouth! I encourage exploration with their hands, we play hide-n-seek games with toys and our hands, and I also included some toddler size spoons and small containers to encourage filling/dumping/beginning tool use. They love it!!!

Contact_FullName:
Crissy Fleetwood
Contact_Email:
crissyfleetwood@yahoo.com

2-9-01

Tired of plain old sand and water in your sensory table? Here are 101 different items to put instead of or in place of sand and water.

1. water 2. jell-o 3. pudding 4. ice 5. packing peanuts or other Styrofoam 6. shredded paper 7. pumpkin guts 8. rice 9. coffee grounds 10. dirt 11. corn meal 12. sea shells 13. seeds 14. dry pasta 15. cooked pasta 16. leaves (try fresh and crinkly ones) 17. clean mud (mix 1 roll white toilet paper (shredded), 1 bar grated Dove soap (use a cheese grater), and warm water (make the water warm enough to melt the soap), only mix enough water to make it the consistency of thick cool whip. This can be saved in airtight containers for later use 18. rocks (all different sizes and shapes but make sure to clean them with rubbing alcohol first) 19. flour 20. pieces of paper to rip 21. corn (right off the ears or cooked) 22. Easter grass 23. snow 24. shaving cream 25. whipped cream 26. feathers 27. yogurt 28. nuts 29. cotton balls 30. straws 31. old bows from Christmas presents 32. salt 33. dry instant mashed potatoes (use them plain or add a little water for a different effect) 34. oatmeal 35. pop corn (popped or plain kernels 36. baby shampoo 37. bubbles 38. pom poms 39. the little holes that come out of a hole punch 40. pine cones 41. flax 42. sawdust 43. almost any kind of cereal 44. baking soda 45. supersand (equal parts of cornmeal and coffee grounds) 46. marbles 47. flower petals 48. hay 49. sugar 50. play dough 51. slippery slime 52. flubber (pour in elmers school glue, a liquid starch a little at a time until it becomes blubbery) 53. buttons 54. cedar shavings 55. sticks/twigs 56. grass clippings 57. jelly beans 58. milk 59. juice 60. honey 61. ice cream 62. whole bananas (let the kids squish them) 63. marshmallows 64. broccoli 65. crackers 66. cookies 67. tomatoes 68. salsa 69. bread crumbs 70. pieces of bread 71. small balls 72. beads 73. puzzle pieces (all different sizes) 74. confetti 75. scarves 76. all different kinds of fabric samples 77. seaweed 78. blocks 79. Leggos 80. coins (be sure to clean them in rubbing alcohol first) 81. Popsicle sticks 82. cottage cheese 83. egg shells (be sure to clean them first with water and rubbing alcohol) 84. blueberries 85. hair gel 86. pipe cleaners 87. ribbon 88. yarn 89. sponges (all different shapes, sizes and colors) 90. instead of putting water or other items in the sensory table put it in Ziploc bags and put the bags in the table, this makes for a different change of pace not to mention MUCH less cleanup 91. plastic Easter eggs 92. candy corn 93. acorns 94. toilet paper and paper towel rolls 95. lids (any kind of lid just make sure it is safe with no sharp edges) 96. clothespins 97. bells (all different sizes) 98. photos 99. seaweed 100.the insides of cassette tapes 101. plastic or rubber animals!

Name:
Verna Cione
Email:
vcione@aol.com

Date: 1-24-01

Fill a tub with warm water. Add small measuring cups, spoons, etc., and let the toddlers play in the water. A great sensory experience and they love it! Don't worry, it mops up.

Name:
Kathy
Email:
kat3668@aol.com

Date: 1-24-01

A fun sensory activity for toddlers is ublek. Mix equal parts of cornstarch and water to a consistency that is firm to pick up yet melts when you hold it in your hand!. Have fun!

Name:
Cassie Mojica
Email:
CassieRaeMojica@cs.com

Date: 1-24-01

Uses for the water table or container:

 Cornstarch is one of our favorite small motor activities. First you start with dry cornstarch then, add enough water to make it slightly runny. Food coloring can be added for extra fun. Add stirring sticks, cups, cars, shovels, spoons, or anything else that would be fun to squish around with. Clean up is easy. Just use soap and water. The cornstarch also brushes off anything it may have gotten on, when it is dry. Have fun squishing or in warmer climates it can be used as a "snow activity".

 

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