Contact_FullName:
Marianna
Contact_Email:
sistrunk@kopower.com

Date: 2-7-00

After explaining and discussing shadows, use a projector to create the child's silhouette on a piece of black paper. Trace it with a white crayon or chalk. Cut out and mount on contrasting paper. This makes a nice keepsake for parents. Children love to see what they look like in profile!! Can also use this as a introduction to President's Day, since Lincoln and Washington are frequently seen in silhouette.


Contact_FullName:
Claudia
Contact_Email:
Juls707@mindspring.com

Date: 1-31-00

You need: crayons or markers, scissors, glue, medium-sized brown paper bags (one for each child), buttons, sequins, yarn. Draw all the groundhog parts. The head, body, legs and tail. Have each child glue the groundhog head to the bottom of a medium size brown paper bag. Ask each child to glue the groundhog body and legs onto the front of the bag. Help each child to glue the tail onto the back of the bag. And Allow each child to personalize his or her puppet by adding buttons, sequins, yarn, and other decorating materials. Make a puppet stage by cutting out a rectangle from one side of a large appliance box. Or, simply turn a classroom table over its side. If desired, have children make scenery for the puppet stage using construction paper, crayons, markers, glitter, cotton balls, and other available materials. Choose volunteers to use their puppets to portray groundhogs who emerge from their holes and react to the weather conditions. Let the children make their own dialogue.


Contact_FullName:
melinda
Contact_Email:
msutter406@aol.com

Date: 1-31-00

A potato groundhog

Precut cardboard circles....Have the children add sand to the circle (or if the snow makes it difficult to do this substitute it with brown sugar) Precut a potato in half.. Add olive eyes and marshmallow teeth to the potato by using glue or toothpicks. Once the groundhog is dry you can glue gun onto the circle. The gluing of the potato is done after all this because it will drip if standing up.


Contact_FullName:
Chrissie
Contact_Email:
chrissie@speedchoice.com

Date: 1-31-00

Have each child make a paper or cardboard groundhog stick puppet with a Popsicle stick. First thing in the morning, carefully stick the stick into the ground so that the groundhog is standing up. Then measure the shadows at 1 hour intervals throughout the day. Chart shadow lengths. Then at the end of the day, discuss why the lengths and directions of shadows varied.


Contact_FullName:
Terri Thomas
Contact_Email:
nascar56@wpa.net

Date: 1-24-00

Since groundhog day is approaching, I thought this would be a good idea to share. Every year, I bring in a large cardboard box and let the children decorate it in "groundhog" fashion. Then the children take turns pretending to be the groundhog. They go in the box, and popping, either seeing or not seeing their "shadow." The kids love to play.


Contact_FullName:
Cathy
Contact_Email:
CMelo41558@aol.com

Date: 1-24-00

February 2nd is Groundhog Day. The old groundhog comes out to play If he sees no shadow in his way. Then Spring will soon be on its way. (I do this in a darkened room and make a groundhog mask for a child to wear. They take turns and crawl through a tunnel and I have a flashlight so when they come out of the play tunnel they see their shadow.


Contact_FullName:
Peggy
Contact_Email:
Pegmil246@aol.com

Date: 1-8-00

Trace a ground hog shape out of brown construction paper and have children glue it to a large sheet of blue construction paper. Children can then draw with markers and crayons adding a sun in the sky and drawing a shadow behind the groundhog. Previous to doing this craft, we usually go outside to see our own shadows (If sunny).


Contact_FullName:
Nancy
Contact_Email:
nvlitzer@AOL.com

idea

I have used this activity with kindergarten children for several years and they love it!

If the sun is shining on Groundhog Day (and there is no snow on the ground) take the children outdoors to a large paved area (we use the end of our parking lot where there is no traffic during the day). Children work with partners. One child "poses" while the partner traces his shadow on the pavement with a piece of sidewalk chalk; then they reverse roles. Some children have trouble with the concept that the line they are following is the edge of the shadow, but once you point this out to them, they do well. Some children also have trouble standing still long enough but they usually will when they see that they will not have a picture if they keep moving. It helps to allow them to experiment with what their shadow can do before you do the drawing activity.

If time and interest allow, the children like to color in the outline of their shadow, draw facial features, clothes, etc. Be sure to have each child write his name by his picture. Remember to have someone trace your shadow too!


Name:

Betty
E-Mail:
farmgirl@warwick.net

Date: 4-18-99

Ground hogs day

Materials need: For Each child -- a front side and back side picture of a ground hog; a brown crayon; a popsicle stick; a foam cup; brown paint mixed with a few drops of dish soap so it will stick to foam cup; paint brushes, and glue

Directions: step 1: turn cup upside down; cut out top; paint with brown paint/soap mixture; let dry. step 2: have students cut out ground hog (or teacher cut out); have students color front and back of groundhog; glue ground hog to stick; let dry.


Name:

Betty
E-Mail:
farmgirl@warwick.net

Date: 4-18-99

Groundhog Day

play activity #1: materials needed - tunnel;

Put tunnel on floor so one end goes up to a wall. Have students take turns crawling into tunnel and then crawling back out pretending to be a groundhog. All students get an individual turn.

fun activity #2 - If weather is permitting, go outside and find your shadow, as well as the shadows of your classmates.


Name:

Kay
E-Mail:
bluebonnet3@hotmail.com

Date: 4-18-99

I teach kindergarten deaf children and the concept of Groundhog's Day is hard for them to understand. All I did was take a sheet of white bullitin board paper (for snowy ground) and cut a big hole in it. After reading a book about Groundhog's Day, I'll let them role play being a groundhog. If the groundhog sees his shadow, (using a lamp as the sun)the student will role play it seeing it's shadow. They will come up from under the paper like the groundhog. Then they will tell the teacher if they see their shadow and if there will be more winter or if spring will come early. The students will do the same thing if the groundhog doesn't see his shadow. Just don't use the lamp this time.


Name:

Michelle
E-Mail:
mbraden@iol19.com

Date: 4-18-99

For a math manipulative for Groundhog Day, I took a shoebox and cut 5 holes in the lid, inserting a toilet paper tube in each hole. These represented groundhog's burrows. I covered the box with green and brown paper, and wrote #'s 1-5 by each "burrow". Then I made 15 little "groundhogs" by gluing little google eyes on 1" tan pompom balls. I added little pompom noses and tiny white teeth. The children were to put the appropriate number of groundhogs into each burrow: ie, one groundhog into the burrow marked "1", three groundhogs into the burrow marked "3", and so on. They loved it!